Great Lakes Today

Elizabeth Miller/ideastream

"Anyone there? Please, tell us - we're all tired and we're all hungry. Please come back!"

Fake distress calls like this one placed via marine radio can sound identical to real ones. And the U.S. Coast Guard 9th District, which covers the Great Lakes, takes every call seriously.

But the number of fake calls has skyrocketed this year.


Great Lakes Today reporter Elizabeth Miller recently appeared on the WVIZ/PBS program Ideas to to discuss Troubled Waters, a recent series looking at the impact of President Trump's proposed budget cuts on the Great Lakes.

Boating fatalities increased 12 percent from 2015 to 2016, according the U.S. Coast Guard. The Coast Guard  released its 2016 Recreational Boating Statistics report this week.  

 

NOAA

The more rain we have this spring, the bigger the Lake Erie algae bloom this summer -- and it’s been a wet spring.

Algae blooms in western Lake Erie are primarily due to excess nutrients from fertilizer chemicals running off farm land.  Some blooms can become toxic, shutting down beaches or sickening people and pets.

Rain helps phosphorus travel from farms to the lake through rivers including the Maumee in western Ohio – and tracking from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration can predict the size of an algae bloom.

Elizabeth Miller/ideastream

Before water contamination emergencies hit Flint, Mich., a crisis in Canada became deadly.

When E. coli invaded the drinking water in Walkerton, half of the town became ill and seven people died. That led to a turnaround in the way the community treats its water and trains workers. 

But a question lingers: Does Walkerton’s tragedy still resonate in the U.S.?

  

Pages