Environment

Pollution cleanup moves ahead on Great Lakes

Mar 2, 2018
Caitlin Whyte

Just off Lake Ontario in Irondequoit Bay, Dave Hulburt is doing some work at the BayCreek Paddling Center.

The shop is closed in winter, but it’s unusually warm and sunny by the water. A few cars drive by, a flock of geese flies overhead, but other than that it’s quiet on the dock.

“As for the water quality right here, our staff swims in the creek every day in the summer time,” he says. “We haven’t grown any extra legs or anything.”

Dr. Rafat Ansari

Canada and the province of Ontario recently released their plan to combat toxic algae blooms in Lake Erie.  Phosphorus is the primary cause of the blooms that turn parts of the lake green most summers.

The U.S. and Canada hope to reduce phosphorus in Lake Erie by 40 percent, from 2008 levels.  It’s all part of the Great Lakes Water Quality Agreement.


Elizabeth Miller/ideastream


Courtesy of Anglican Church

For Christians, the weeks leading up to Easter are a time of sacrifice. And many observe by giving up chocolate, alcohol or other treats.

But the Anglican Church has another suggestion this year. It's urging members to take the Lent Plastics Challenge and reduce their use of straws, cups, bottles and many other plastic products.

A politically divided America finds little common ground on the environment, according to a national survey by the Pew Research Center.

Although 81 percent of Democrats said protecting the environment should be a top priority, only 37 percent of Republicans agreed. And though 68 percent of Democrats said dealing with climate change should be a top priority, just 18 percent of Republicans agreed.

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