Dave Rosenthal

Great Lakes Today Managing Editor

Dave is new to the Great Lakes area, but has many fond memories of vacations on another large body of water: Long Island Sound. He is the former investigations editor for The Baltimore Sun. There, he led projects that won a number of honors, including the Clark Mollenhoff Award for Excellence in Investigative Reporting, Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism's Paul Tobenkin Memorial Award and the Investigative Reporters & Editors breaking news award. Dave has degrees from Wesleyan University and Boston University School of Law.

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NOAA

Algae blooms have started in western Lake Erie, and a researchers say the unusually warm weather may make things worse.

Scientists predict the bloom will be smaller than it was last year, when large swaths of the lake were colored a sickly green. But a federal government forecast says it still could be one of the four or five worst blooms since 2002.

Chuck Quirmbach

President Trump traveled to Wisconsin today for the ground-breaking of a sprawling high-tech factory where Foxconn will make LCD panels.

Wisconsin used huge incentives to attract the Taiwan company's plant, which is expected to employ some 13,000 workers.  

But the plant also has sparked debate because it will use millions of gallons of water each day from Lake Michigan.

On June 16, 1962, The New Yorker published one of those articles that aspires to -- and achieves -- something much larger. The first part of the series was called Silent Spring-I, and Rachel Carson's words (later converted to book form) became the anthem of America's fledgling environmental movement.

Her article began simply, like a fairy tale: "There was once a town in the heart of America where all life seemed to be in harmony with its surroundings ... .

Rolf Peterson

The National Park Service has announced a plan to import wolves to Isle Royale National Park, a move designed to restore the natural balance between predator and prey. And that means the island's moose had better watch out.

USGS

A new study explains how the bloody red shrimp -- and other non-native species -- can travel across the Great Lakes. It's pretty simple: They hitch a ride in the ballast tanks of "lakers," the ships that travel around the lakes, but never make it out to the ocean.

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