GLRI proves economic boost along Great Lakes Corridor

A new study shows a boost in economic activity in communities along the Great Lakes Corridor where Great Lakes Restoration Initiative projects took place.

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Beer, Drinking Water And Fish: Tiny Plastic Is Everywhere

Plastic trash is littering the land and fouling rivers and oceans. But what we can see is only a small fraction of what's out there. Since modern plastic was first mass-produced, 8 billion tons have been manufactured. And when it's thrown away, it doesn't just disappear. Much of it crumbles into small pieces. Scientists call the tiny pieces "microplastics" and define them as objects smaller than 5 millimeters — about the size of one of the letters on a computer keyboard. Researchers started...

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Latest From Great Lakes Today

Elizabeth Miller/ideastream

Forecast calls for significant algae bloom on Lake Erie

Scientists predict a significant harmful algae bloom for western Lake Erie this year. The forecast, a joint effort between the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Heidelberg University and other partners, predicts a bloom severity of six on a 10-point scale. That would be better than last year , but worse than 2016.

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Environmental Injustice

In the Great Lakes region, minorities face a greater burden from air pollution, water contamination and other environmental hazards. A look at the issue – and related health problems.

New Faces, New Issues

Teddy Roosevelt and John Muir helped launch the nation’s environmental movement more than a century ago. Great Lakes Today explores the forces – and people -behind the transformation of the movement.

Video: Salt mine lies 1,800 feet under Lake Erie

Have you ever wondered where road salt comes from? One source is the Whiskey Island Cargill Salt Mine, which lies far below the floor of Lake Erie.

Environment

The Great Lakes are significantly cleaner today, now that many of the region's factories have closed. But environmental challenges -- including pollution and invasive species -- remain.

History

For centuries, the Great Lakes have served as an important food source and trade route for people living along their shore.

Recreation

The Great Lakes are the home to a wide range of recreation -- from sailboat and powerboat races to fishing tournaments. They're also a draw for tourists.

Development

Across the Great Lakes region, the shoreline is being targeted for increased development.

Invasive Species

The Great Lakes ecosystem has been severely damaged by more than 180 invasive and non-native species.

Shipping

The Great Lakes is often referred to as the "fourth seacoast." U.S. and Canadian lake fleets annually haul upwards of 125 million tons of cargo, including iron ore, limestone and coal.

Regulation

The Great Lakes, which straddle the U.S.-Canada border, are subject to multiple layers of regulation.

Farming

Great Lakes agriculture generates more than $15 billion a year and it accounts for 7% of total U.S. food production. Agricultural practices shape the health of the lakes and the farming economy.